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This amazing post was written by Jenn Ryan, a freelance writer and editor who’s passionate about natural health, fitness, gluten-free, and animals. You can read more of her work at thegreenwritingdesk.com.

Stinging Nettle for Prostate Health

It’s called stinging nettle for a reason! This so called “weed” is native to many countries, including North America, Europe, and Asia, and will burn you if you touch it. Seriously! Luckily for you, the burn is minor, although it can sometimes last for hours. Ouch! Why would anyone ever want to harvest this herb?

Just put some gloves on and get some clippers if you find this miracle plant growing in the woods. It’s not a big deal. In fact, some people with chronic pain say the mild stinging feeling is soothing. Let’s learn more about this herb and how it’s good for a variety of adverse health symptoms, including promoting prostate health and combating benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is extremely common among men as they age.

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What Is Stinging Nettle?

Stinging nettle is part of the nettle family of herbs that have over 500 species in their clan. Its leaves are dark green, heart-shaped, and contain fine “hairs” that contain agents like histamine that will cause itching and burning upon contact with you. It’s been used since ancient times for a variety of things, including internal and external bleeding, soothing skin rashes, and even getting glossy hair!

Stinging nettle is one of the first herbs to pop up in the spring. It looks innocent enough and even has a pleasant smell, but you’ll want to be wary of getting near this plant without the proper gear on! How does stinging nettle help with the prostate?

Stinging Nettle Promotes Prostate Health

The prostate, for those of you that didn’t know, is a small organ located behind the bladder in men. The purpose of the prostate is to create fluid that will be ejaculated along with the sperm to make up semen. The other components in semen protect the sperm and help to keep it alive until it can reach an egg. Issues with the prostate might not seem like a big deal for those who don’t care much about their sperm or whether or not it reaches an egg, however, there is one important thing about the prostate to note: the urethra runs through it.

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What this means is that when there’s a problem with the prostate, your lower urinary tract health is inevitably affected. So when you have a condition like, say, BPH in which the prostate becomes inflamed, it puts pressure on your urethra. This causes the feeling of having to urinate more often, having trouble urinating, painful urination, and even painful ejaculation! Ouch! No one wants that. How can stinging nettle help?

Stinging nettle actually combats inflammation and promotes health of the lower urinary tract. Studies show that patients who suffer from symptoms of BPH find relief when using stinging nettle. It helps the inflammation go down, therefore making your symptoms go away and restoring the health of your prostate. It’s not really known why BPH happens and there’s not much treatment for it besides medication and surgery.

Where Can I Get It?

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Stinging nettle can be found locally if you happen to have a bit of land or visit your local woods if you can identify the plant. Its burn is pretty unmistakable. However, if you’re not about venturing into the woods to look for an herb that’ll burn you upon contact, you have other options.

  • Grow your own. Seeds for stinging nettle can be found online for as little as two dollars. If you’re into gardening, grow some!

  • Get it dried. Some bulk herb stores online or at your local shop sell stinging nettle, already harvested and dried for you to make a tea!

  • Buy tea. If buying dried herbs is still a little bit more work than you’re looking for, you can always buy stinging nettle already in tea bags, packaged up nicely for you! Order online or find at your local health store.

  • Get a tincture. Tinctures of stinging nettle are also available, and are usually made to be taken in a glass of water with a few drops due to its concentration.

  • Buy supplements. Get a high-quality supplement of stinging nettle to help with any prostate issues you’re having. It’s important to get a good supplement, not one that has fillers in it which promise a low-quality supplement with a low concentration of stinging nettle in there.

Lucky for you, stinging nettle is very popular, making it widely available in different mediums for your convenience. Its health benefits have been long known and observed among ancient cultures.

What Do I Do with It?

If you’ve grown or harvested your stinging nettle fresh, good for you, you sassy thing. Here’s what you can do with it once you’ve harvested it:

  • Show your friends that you conquered the nettle. They’ll no doubt be impressed that you braved the forests and/or weeds in your garden to get to this feisty plant!

  • Cook it. Cooking nettle and eating it just as you would any other steamed vegetable also has the health benefits of taking a nettle tea or supplement.

  • Make a soup. Nettle soup, anyone? This would be best for when you have a cold or need an immune boost, as nettle helps your lovely immune system.

  • Make a tea. All you need is a cup of fresh leaves, bring to a boil, and let steep to desired strength. Strain and pour into your favorite teacup!

As you can see, stinging nettle might try to fight you off, but the benefits and wide uses for this plant make it worth the fight. If you’ve been diagnosed with BPH or any other prostate issues, consider using stinging nettle to help relieve your symptoms rather than conventional medicine (which often has side effects that are not pleasant). Consider talking to an herbalist or consulting an herb shop who can better advise you on the strength and dosage to take than conventional docs!

Image source:

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Jenn Ryan
Health Expert
Jenn Ryan is a freelance writer and editor who's passionate about natural health, fitness, gluten-free, and animals. She loves running, reading, and playing with her four rescued rabbits.
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