thermometer with sunlit city in background. High temperature concept
Sean Cate
Sean Cate
May 22, 2024 ·  6 min read

These US States Are About to Have a Brutally Hot Summer

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has issued a warning for this summer in The United States. 20% of all states are expected to have record-breaking heatwaves this year, so the NOAA has tried to highlight the increased risk of droughts and wildfires due to the increased heat.1 This dramatic rise in temperatures is attributed to a few different factors, including the ongoing El Niño event in the Pacific Ocean as well as the effects of human-induced climate change. Here are 20 states that will be experiencing record-breaking hot summers:

Texas

Credit: Pixabay

Texas, already famous for its hot summers, is anticipated to face even more extreme heat this year. In the past several decades, cities like Austin have seen a surge in triple-digit days, creating a worrying trend. The impending La Niña phenomenon suggests that Texas will be extremely vulnerable to longer heatwaves and intensified drought conditions.2

Read More: It’s One of The Deadliest Cancers In America, And It’s On The Rise. These 10 States Have The Highest Rates

Nevada

Credit: Pixabay

Residents are preparing for another summer of oppressive heat. Last year, the state endured multiple days of triple-digit temperatures back to back, and this summer is expected to be no different. Nevada is likely to experience worsened drought conditions from last year, making it a potential hotbed for wildfires.

New Mexico

Credit: Pixabay

New Mexico is also bracing for a hot summer, only made worse by the transition from El Niño to La Niña conditions. The National Weather Service’s statement has raised concerns about heat-related illnesses and strains on energy resources.

Utah

Credit: Pixabay

Utah is accustomed to hot summers, but now faces the looming threat of heat domes. Heat domes are extended periods of high pressure, sunny weather. La Niña’s is to blame for these domes, and the state has been urged to prepare for extreme heat events.

California

Credit: Pixabay

California is also no stranger to scorching temperatures and brutal wildfires,  but they’re also gearing up for a challenging summer. The NOAA’s prediction warns of additional, hotter heatwaves and long periods of dry, hot weather (we all remember how bad last year was).3 Authorities are urging Californians to be vigilant and follow heat safety guidelines to best prepare for the extreme heat.

Washington

Credit: Pixabay

La Niña’s influence is expected to reach drought conditions all over the Pacific Northwest, making Washington a prime target for one hot summer. Wildfire and water shortage concerns are high, and state officials are already implementing measures to protect the vulnerable and dot heir best to prepare for prolonged heatwaves.

Oregon

Credit: Pixabay

Oregon is also a great candidate for the intense heatwaves and heightened wildfire risks this summer. La Niña’s is only going to make things warmer and drier across the state, making the threat of heat-related illnesses quite real and stressing critical infrastructure. Stay informed, take the right precautions, and stay safe during what will be a very hot summer.

Read More: This area in Detroit is now America’s first self-sustainable agrihood

Idaho

Credit: Pixabay

Idaho’s diverse landscapes will all have one thing in common this summer:  extreme heat. La Niña’s influence is very real for drought conditions and extreme temperatures across the state, making it extremely vulnerable to wildfires and heat-related health issues. Make sure you stay hydrated, seek shade, and avoid outdoor activities during peak heat hours.

Montana

Credit: Pixabay

Montana is also at high risk due to the heatwaves and drought conditions this summer. La Niña’s will be contributing to above-normal temperatures across the state, making a hot summer ripe for wildfires and creating a serious strain on essential resources.

Wyoming

Credit: Pixabay

The prolonged heatwaves due to La Niña’s influence is expected to create extreme drought conditions and create a hot summer across the entire state. Authorities are doing their best to implement strategies to lower the impact of the extreme heat and protect critical infrastructure.

Colorado

Credit: Pixabay

Colorado is bracing for hot summer with increased temperatures and major drought risks. The state is already pretty vulnerable to heatwaves and wildfires, making preparedness for the season all the more important.

New York

Credit: Pixabay

Yes, even New York expected to have above-normal temperatures this summer, with prolonged heatwaves and heat-related risks running high. La Niña’s is expected to only make matters worse through pretty much all of the Northeast, creating concerns about water shortages and stressing energy resources.

New Jersey

Credit: Pixabay

And of course, New Jersey is also bracing for escalating heat this summer. There will be longer heatwaves than last year and authorities are implementing  measures to protect those at risk.

Read More: 10 Best Stargazing Spots In The World

Maine

Credit: Pixabay

Maine is preparing for an intensely hot summer. Lengthy heatwaves and serious drought conditions have public health and safety on everyones mind, prompting authorities to implement measures to protect the vulnerable. Be sure to stay hydrated, seek cool shelter, and check on vulnerable neighbors during periods of extreme heat.

Vermont

Credit: Pixabay

Beautiful Vermont is bracing for a hot summer too, with drought conditions and elevated temperatures across the state thanks to La Niña. Authorities are advising everyone to do their best to stay hydrated, and stay in cool shelter, especially during peak hours.

New Hampshire

Credit: Pixabay

New Hampshire will be facing rising temperatures and prolonged heatwaves this summer. More drought conditions and higher temperatures across the state here too, putting public health and safety at risk. Residents are encouraged to stay informed, hydrated, and be mindful to stay safe during periods of extreme heat.

Massachusetts

Credit: Pixabay

Massachusetts will be dealing with a very hot summer this year thank to La Niña’s. The state is showing great preparedness and resilience when it comes to protecting public health, as the state is one already susceptible to droughts.

Rhode Island

Credit: Pixabay

As part of the North East, Rhode Island is also anticipating heat concerns this summer. La Niña’s is expected to make drought conditions worse and make a hot summer across the state. Prolonged heatwaves are likely and raise concerns about public health and safety. 

Connecticut

Credit: Pixabay

Connecticut is is preparing for high temperatures and potential drought conditions this summer. The state is particularly vulnerable to heatwaves, and therefore wildfires, making need for preparedness all the more important.

Pennsylvania

Credit: Pixabay

Lastly, Pennsylvania is also dealing with heat hazards this summer. La Niña’s reach stops here but the entire country should brace for a particularly hot summer.

Conclusion

Credit: Pixabay

As a large portion of The United States braces for a brutally hot summer due to La Niña (and the rest because of overall rising temperatures), it is extremely important that residents, authorities, and policymakers prioritize heat safety measures. This is the best way to lower the impacts of extreme temperatures and protect the vulnerable from the prolonged heatwaves that will very likely be here for a while.

Read More: 9 “Facts” You Learned In School That Are No Longer True

Sources

  1. These US states are about to have a brutally hot summer.” BGR. Joshua Hawkins. April 27, 2024.
  2. U.S. officials are bracing for another summer of dangerous heat. These maps show where it’s most likely to happen.CBS News.  Li Cohen. April 30, 2024.
  3. Climate extremes likely to drive land mammal extinction during next supercontinent assembly.” Nature. Alexander Farnsworth, Y. T. Eunice Lo, Paul J. Valdes, Jonathan R. Buzan, Benjamin J. W. Mills, Andrew S. Merdith, Christopher R. Scotese and Hannah R. Wakeford. September 25, 2023.